Tag Archives: Mabel Dunham

Books Acquired Recently

Bombardier, Cooper Lee. Pass with Care: Memoirs. New York: Dottir Press, 2020.

I first encountered Bombardier’s work in the anthology Meanwhile, Elsewhere: Science Fiction and Fantasy from Transgender Writers. His story there is fantastic, and I was excited to discover months ago on social media that he was coming out with a memoir. I pre-ordered it then and it arrived a few days ago.

Dunham, B. Mabel. Toward Sodom. Toronto: Macmillan, 1927.

I recently learned about Dunham and her path-breaking writing in the field of Mennonite literature. Her novel The Trail of the Conestoga might be the first Mennonite novel in English, and its sequel, Toward Sodom, might be the second. I was able to find a used copy of the latter online. It arrived in the mail today.

Zapruder, Matthew. Why Poetry. New York: Ecco, 2017.

As I mentioned in a recent post, “I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the role of literature in apocalyptic times such as these. Reading poetry on a daily basis is helping me to survive emotionally. Therefore, I’ve been looking for texts related to this subject.” Acquiring Zapruder’s book is part of these explorations.

Leave a comment

Filed under Literature

Books Acquired Recently

Back, Rachel Tzvia. What Use is Poetry the Poet is Asking. Bristol, UK: Shearsman Books, 2019.

I received this book from a friend. She lives in Tulsa, where Magic City Books recently held a sale of some books that Joy Harjo donated from her personal library as a fundraiser for a local food bank. The book is inscribed to Harjo by Back and came with a letter from Harjo to the purchaser. So it is a fantastic object. I am enjoying the poetry as well thus far.

Dunham, Mabel. The Trail of the Conestoga. 1924. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1970.

I recently heard about this novel, which may be the oldest Mennonite novel in English, which is why I am interested in it. I was able to find a new copy of the 1990 reprinting of the 1970 printing online, and it came today.

Leave a comment

Filed under Literature