Monthly Archives: February 2017

Books Acquired Recently

Clare, Eli. Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2017.

Clare’s book Exile and Pride is an essential disabilities studies text, and when I saw that his new book had come out I ordered it immediately.

Cunningham, Agnes, and Gordon Friesen. Red Dust and Broadsides: A Joint Autobiography. Edited by Ronald D. Cohen. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press, 1999.

Friesen wrote the first important Mennonite novel in the U.S., Flamethrowers, and then fell off of the literary map until some relatively recent scholarly efforts to examine his work. I just found out that he co-wrote this autobiography with his wife, who was an important folk singer. My obsession with Mennonite literature compelled me to buy it right away.

Halberstam, J. Jack [as Judith Halberstam]. In a Queer Time and Place: Transgender Bodies, Subcultural Lives. New York: New York University Press, 2005.

I enjoyed Halberstam’s book The Queer Art of Failure and frequently encounter citations of In a Queer Time and Place, so I thought I should finally buy it and read it for myself.

Lowrey, Sassafras. A Little Queermas Carol. Brooklyn, NY: PoMo Freakshow Press, 2016.

—. Roving Pack. Brooklyn, NY: PoMo Freakshow Press, 2012.

I immediately ordered all of Lowrey’s fiction after seeing hir read at AWP a few weeks ago. I loved hir novel Lost Boi, a BDSM retelling of Peter Pan, and I’ve already read and enjoyed A Little Queermas Carol, which is a BDSM retelling of A Christmas Carol.

McInerney, Jay. Bright Lights, Big City. New York: Vintage Books, 1984.

I received this book as a Valentine’s Day gift. I have heard of McInerney, but never read any of his work, so I look forward to experiencing it.

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Books Acquired Recently: AWP Edition Plus One

awp17

AWP:

I just attended the Associated Writing Programs (AWP) conference for the first time this past week. It was a fantastic conference, and one of the best things about it was the huge book fair. There was so much literature to choose from that it became an overwhelming task. I thus developed the following buying strategy: I would stop at publisher tables that looked interesting and ask them if they had any queer texts. If they did, I would consider those texts. I came away with some exciting-looking books by authors that I mostly have never heard of before (and therefore some of the books do not have annotations).

Cho, Tom. Look Who’s Morphing. 2009. Vancouver: Arsenal Pulp Press, 2014.

Cho presented at the same panel as Sassafras Lowrey did (mentioned below). I made a note to look up his work because he discussed the work of Tom of Finland, which I care deeply for. When I went to buy Lowrey’s book I happily discovered Cho’s book right next to it on the table.

Gaydos, Rebecca. Güera. Oakland: Omnidawn Publishing, 2016.

Guzman, Dena Rash. Joseph. Oakland: Hologram Press, 2017.

I attended a poetry reading including Guzman on Thursday morning and she had copies of her new collection for sale. I enjoyed listening to her, bought the book, and discovered that it is even better than it seemed to be at the reading!

July, Miranda. It Chooses You. San Francisco: McSweeney’s Books, 2011.

I love July’s work and was excited to get this book for only $10.00.

Lowrey, Sassafras. Lost Boi. Vancouver: Arsenal Pulp Press, 2015.

I heard Lowrey speak at a panel, and ze said that this novel was on sale at the book fair. After hearing hir speak I wanted to read hir writing immediately. I’m halfway through the novel (a BDSM-inflected retelling of Peter Pan) and it is amazing! When I got home this afternoon I went online and ordered the rest of hir books.

Mondrup, Iben. Justine. Translated by Kerri A. Pieroe. Rochester, NY: Open Letter, 2016.

Parzybok, Benjamin. Sherwood Nation. Easthampton, MA: Small Beer Press, 2014.

Ratzlaff, Keith. Dubious Angels: Poems After Paul Klee. Tallahassee, FL: Anhinga Press, 2005.

Ratzlaff is a Mennonite poet who I had dinner with on Friday night (there were a number of Mennonite writers and literary critics at the conference who all got together for dinner). He mentioned that his books were available at the book fair and I got this volume on sale for $5.00. I finished reading it this morning and quite enjoyed it.

Plus One:

Spark, Muriel. The Comforters. 1957. New York: New Directions, 2014.

Last night I visited Kramer Books with a friend. While browsing their fiction section I came across a book by Muriel Spark (who I love) that I haven’t read yet and decided to buy it.

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Book Acquired Recently: In Search of Silence: The Journals of Samuel R. Delany

Delany, Samuel R. In Search of Silence: The Journals of Samuel R. Delany: Volume 1, 1957-1969. Ed. Kenneth R. James. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2017.

This mammoth tome (660 pages) arrived in the mail today. Delany is one of my favorite writers, and his work has had an immeasurable effect on my thinking. I am especially fond of his personal writing and am thus excited to read these excerpts from his journals. The book is part of a proposed series of selections from his journals throughout his life; at the current pace it will take at least five volumes to complete the set. My only hesitancy about it is that it is edited by someone other than Delany (who is normally very meticulous about the presentation of his work), and I am not sure what this portends. I hope that it does not mean that Delany is not well enough to do the task himself.

I bought the book from amazon.com. It is the first book in my collection with a 2017 copyright date.

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