Monthly Archives: July 2015

Books Acquired Recently: Poetry Edition

Epp, Joanne. Eigenheim. Winnipeg: Turnstone, 2015.

I’ll be reviewing this collection of poetry for Mennonite Quarterly Review, and just received the review copy in the mail. I’ve never read any of Epp’s work before, thus I am excited to get acquainted with the work of another Mennonite writer.

Mirell, Gregory Scott, ed. Utica Poets Society Compendium, Volume 1. Utica: VBLP, 2013.

—, ed. Utica Poets Society Compendium, Volume 2. Utica: VBLP, 2014.

My favorite coffeehouse in Utica, the Tramontane Cafe, recently held a fundraiser that I participated in, and these two volumes of poetry by regular readers from their weekly poetry open mics are one of the gifts they gave contributors.

Van Den Heuvel, Cor, and Nanae Tamura, eds. Baseball Haiku: American and Japanese Haiku and Senryu on Baseball. New York: Norton, 2007.

I was visiting the Oneonta, New York Public Library earlier this week and picked this anthology (hardcover, in like-new condition) up for only $1.00 from their book sale. Baseball and poetry are two great tastes that taste great together, and I also enjoy haiku (the one exception to my strong dislike of poetic forms), so the book was an exciting discovery. It is a perfect companion for reading during between-inning commercials.

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Books Acquired Recently: Road Trip Edition

I just got back from a two-week road trip through Pennsylvania and New York to visit some family and friends, and did some book shopping along the way, all at independent bookstores. Here is what I acquired:

Ashbery, John. Breezeway. New York: Ecco, 2015.

I have always enjoyed Ashbery’s work, and his newest book has gotten good reviews, and I’ve been craving some poetry lately, so I thought I would pick it up. I bought it, Gessen and Squibb’s anthology, and Koch’s book at my favorite place in the world, the Strand.

Gessen, Keith, and Stephen Squibb, eds. City by City: Dispatches from the American Metropolis. New York: Farrar, 2015.

One of the things I love about going to the Strand is finding amazing books that I otherwise wouldn’t have discovered, and this book looks like it will be another instance of that tradition. It is a collection of essays about the current status of various American cities (some large, like Los Angeles, and some relatively small, like Syracuse) and how they have coped with the aftermath of the 2008 economic crash. I am fascinated by both halves of this topic, thus the decision to buy the book was an instant one.

Holmes, Safiya Henderson. Madness and a Bit of Hope. New York: Harlem River, 1990.

I haven’t heard of Holmes before, but her book caught my eye because of the name of the publisher. It has a blurb by June Jordan, who has been an important poet for me, and even though it is signed (“To: Nancy Thank you so much for being here snow & all Safiya ’92”) I was able to buy it for only $5.00 from the Rose & the Laurel Bookshop in Oneonta, New York.

Koch, Kenneth. On the Edge: Collected Long Poems. New York: Knopf, 2007.

I really enjoy Koch’s work and think that his longer poems are some of the best in the American tradition. I’ve been wanting to buy this book for a while: I first discovered it at the Strand several years ago, but didn’t buy it, and have regretted it ever since. Happily, on this visit they had a copy in pristine condition, much better than the original one that I had considered buying.

Lee, Harper. Go Set a Watchman. New York: Harper, 2015.

Like everyone else interested in American literature, I am in a tizzy about Lee’s new novel, in which Atticus Finch is apparently not nearly as sympathetic as he is in To Kill a Mockingbird. I am horrified that Go Set a Watchman might destroy the experience of To Kill a Mockingbird for me, but of course have to read it anyway. I bought my copy at The Green Toad Bookstore in Oneonta, New York.

Sexton, Anne. Selected Poems of Anne Sexton. Ed. Diane Wood Middlebrook and Diana Hume George. 1988. Boston: Houghton, 2000.

I’ve enjoyed Sexton’s poems that I have encountered in anthologies and in the one collection of hers that I’ve read, Transformations. As noted above I’ve been in a poetry-reading mood lately, so when I found a copy of this book in excellent condition for a good price ($9.50) at Winding Way Books in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, I decided to buy it.

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Books Acquired Recently

Burroughs, William S. Queer. 1985. New York: Penguin, 1987.

I haven’t read much Burroughs before, but have been meaning to read this novel for quite some time.

Kureishi, Hanif. Outskirts and Other Plays: The King and Me, Borderline, Birds of Passage. London: Faber, 1992.

I love Kureishi’s fiction, but have never read any of his dramatic works. Coming across this omnibus edition seemed like a good occasion to begin doing so.

These two books were bought from The Word bookstore in Montreal on my recent trip there. It is a wonderful little place with books stacked in orderly fashion from floor to ceiling. The prices are very reasonable; both books were each only $6.95 Canadian, and both are in excellent condition.

Rubin, Richard E. Foundations of Library and Information Science. 3rd ed. New York: Neal-Schuman, 2010.

I have been thinking a lot about libraries and their role in our increasingly book-phobic society lately, and realized that I don’t know that much about the discipline of library science itself, including issues of how libraries choose what to collect and what to neglect. I decided to purchase this textbook to help remedy my lack of knowledge.

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My Trip to the Women’s World Cup Semifinal

Me all kitted out in my supporters gear before the match.

Me all kitted out in my supporters gear before the match. I took all of the photographs in this post with my iPhone.

On Tuesday I attended the Women’s World Cup semifinal between the U.S. and Germany held at Montreal’s Olympic Stadium. It was an amazing experience! The match was a good one, especially since the U.S. won 2-0.

The U.S. warming up before the match. Twenty years from now in footage from the tournament Nike's ridiculous neon-and-black uniforms are going to look super-dated.

The U.S. warming up before the match. Twenty years from now in footage from the tournament Nike’s ridiculous neon-and-black uniforms are going to look super-dated.

The two teams walking out onto the pitch before the match. The crowd was so loud that it drowned out the beginning of "The Star-Spangled Banner."

The two teams walking out onto the pitch before the match. Note the number of fans also taking pictures with their phones. The crowd was so loud that it drowned out the beginning of “The Star-Spangled Banner.”

There were over 51,000 people in attendance, and the large majority were rooting for the U.S. I have attended numerous sporting events (mostly baseball, but also football, hockey, and basketball, and a men’s World Cup qualifier which you can read about here), but never have I felt that the crowd affected the outcome of a game as much as it did in this match. It was a de facto home game for the U.S. both in terms of geographical setting and crowd support, and this helped the U.S. get off to an energetic start. However, the crowd made the most difference when Celia Sasic missed a penalty kick for Germany early in the second half. When the referee called the penalty, an anguished hush went over the crowd, but as Sasic prepared to take it the crowd began getting louder, cheering U.S. keeper Hope Solo on, and the fact that 50,000 people were all thinking “miss it, miss it” at the same time certainly helped to make it so. I know that sounds ridiculous, but it’s what happened. The crowd willed her to miss it, and she did. The cheer after the ball went wide was the loudest sound I have ever heard! It was nearly matched by the cheer when the U.S. was awarded a penalty soon afterward, and then surpassed after Carli Lloyd converted it. The cheer after the U.S. scored their second goal to seal the win was not nearly as loud or long (in part because there was a sense of peace after Lloyd’s goal that the U.S.’s defense would take care of the rest, so while the second goal was nice, the 1-0 lead had not felt especially precarious), and the cheer for Abby Wambach when she came on as a substitute nearly surpassed it, which illustrates how important Wambach still is for the fans even though her role on the team has lessened.

The U.S. players saluting the fans after the match.

The U.S. players saluting the fans after the match.

Aside from enjoying the match as a fan, I also had fun people-watching. The venue is terrible for soccer because of the shape of the stadium, the metal seats that must date from the stadium’s construction for the 1976 Summer Olympics are the most uncomfortable stadium seats I’ve ever sat in (they spring closed whenever their occupant stands up, so every time people got up for a better view of a U.S. scoring chance there would be loud clangs from the seats all around), and the restrooms are woefully inadequate (the men’s room near my section ran out of paper towels before the match even started; the only positive thing I can say about Olympic Stadium is that the french fries they serve there are excellent). But feeling the energy in the crowd and looking at all the different combinations of U.S. gear worn by the fans made these deficiencies inconsequential.

The sea of red, white, and blue-clad fans before the match.

The sea of red, white, and blue-clad fans before the match.

There were a few German fans scattered throughout the crowd. I'm not sure if the woman at the top left of the photograph is yelling at them or something else.

There were a few German fans scattered throughout the crowd. I’m not sure if the woman at the top left of the photograph is yelling at them or something else.

There was a random guy wearing a Russian hockey sweater, which was interesting considering that Russia did not even make the tournament. It is difficult to see, but he had pins from a variety of teams and events spangled across his chest.

There was a random guy wearing a Russian hockey sweater, which was interesting considering that Russia did not even make the tournament. It is difficult to see, but he had pins from a variety of teams and events spangled across his chest.

I have wanted to attend a World Cup match since my early teens, and having this dream come true in Montreal was everything I hoped it would be.

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