Tag Archives: Anne Sexton

Books Acquired Recently: Road Trip Edition

I just got back from a two-week road trip through Pennsylvania and New York to visit some family and friends, and did some book shopping along the way, all at independent bookstores. Here is what I acquired:

Ashbery, John. Breezeway. New York: Ecco, 2015.

I have always enjoyed Ashbery’s work, and his newest book has gotten good reviews, and I’ve been craving some poetry lately, so I thought I would pick it up. I bought it, Gessen and Squibb’s anthology, and Koch’s book at my favorite place in the world, the Strand.

Gessen, Keith, and Stephen Squibb, eds. City by City: Dispatches from the American Metropolis. New York: Farrar, 2015.

One of the things I love about going to the Strand is finding amazing books that I otherwise wouldn’t have discovered, and this book looks like it will be another instance of that tradition. It is a collection of essays about the current status of various American cities (some large, like Los Angeles, and some relatively small, like Syracuse) and how they have coped with the aftermath of the 2008 economic crash. I am fascinated by both halves of this topic, thus the decision to buy the book was an instant one.

Holmes, Safiya Henderson. Madness and a Bit of Hope. New York: Harlem River, 1990.

I haven’t heard of Holmes before, but her book caught my eye because of the name of the publisher. It has a blurb by June Jordan, who has been an important poet for me, and even though it is signed (“To: Nancy Thank you so much for being here snow & all Safiya ’92”) I was able to buy it for only $5.00 from the Rose & the Laurel Bookshop in Oneonta, New York.

Koch, Kenneth. On the Edge: Collected Long Poems. New York: Knopf, 2007.

I really enjoy Koch’s work and think that his longer poems are some of the best in the American tradition. I’ve been wanting to buy this book for a while: I first discovered it at the Strand several years ago, but didn’t buy it, and have regretted it ever since. Happily, on this visit they had a copy in pristine condition, much better than the original one that I had considered buying.

Lee, Harper. Go Set a Watchman. New York: Harper, 2015.

Like everyone else interested in American literature, I am in a tizzy about Lee’s new novel, in which Atticus Finch is apparently not nearly as sympathetic as he is in To Kill a Mockingbird. I am horrified that Go Set a Watchman might destroy the experience of To Kill a Mockingbird for me, but of course have to read it anyway. I bought my copy at The Green Toad Bookstore in Oneonta, New York.

Sexton, Anne. Selected Poems of Anne Sexton. Ed. Diane Wood Middlebrook and Diana Hume George. 1988. Boston: Houghton, 2000.

I’ve enjoyed Sexton’s poems that I have encountered in anthologies and in the one collection of hers that I’ve read, Transformations. As noted above I’ve been in a poetry-reading mood lately, so when I found a copy of this book in excellent condition for a good price ($9.50) at Winding Way Books in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, I decided to buy it.

Leave a comment

Filed under Literature

Books Acquired Recently

Delany, Samuel R. The Einstein Intersection. New York: Ace, 1967.

I bought this and Anne Sexton’s book for $1.00 each at Savers Thrift Store in Salt Lake City, whose book section was recommended to me by a student. I already have the current Wesleyan University Press edition of this novel, but I collect different printings of Delany’s work because he is my favorite author and because the older paperbacks are often quite aesthetically pleasing. This one’s spine is slanted a little, but is otherwise in good shape. I got very excited when I found it on the shelf.

Himes, Chester. If He Hollers Let Him Go. 1945. Cambridge: Da Capo, 2002.

Himes is a twentieth-century African American novelist who is largely ignored by critics because he wrote mostly mysteries, though he wanted to be a “serious” writer. Due to his marginal canonicity I never encountered him in school, and am thus trying to fill a gap in my knowledge by acquiring and reading this book.

Bought on amazon.com. It is a boring new paperback, which is why it does not get a photograph. The vintage copies that amazon had listed were just as expensive as the one I bought, so I decided to buy it new in order to have the current edition just in case I like it so much that I decide to teach it sometime.

Sexton, Anne. Transformations. Illus. Barbara Swan. Boston: Houghton, 1971.

This collection includes Sexton’s famous poems about fairytales. I love these poems, and they are usually a hit with students. I will appreciate the opportunity to read them in their original context rather than in an anthology. I haven’t read much poetry this summer, but am excited to get back on the wagon.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Literature