Monthly Archives: May 2018

Books Acquired Recently

Burkholder, J. Lawrence. Recollections of a Sectarian Realist: A Mennonite Life in the Twentieth Century. Ed. Myrna Burkholder. Elkhart, IN: Institute of Mennonite Studies, 2016.

I did a paper on Burkholder, who was a rebel Mennonite theologian at Harvard (he got his Ph.D. at Princeton) before becoming president of the Mennonite-owned Goshen College, when I was an undergraduate. Burkholder was kind enough to meet me for lunch to discuss it. At the time, I thought his ideas were much too liberal, but now I appreciate his thought a lot more. I decided to buy this memoir after reading a fascinating review of it in Mennonite Quarterly Review. I purchased it online from the Anabaptist Mennonite Biblical Seminary bookstore. The rest of the books were bought from amazon.com.

Cantú, Francisco. The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches from the Border. New York: Riverhead Books, 2018.

I bought this and Luiselli’s book as background reading for a writing retreat on the Arizona/Sonora border that I’ll be on next month.

Delany, Samuel R. Heavenly Breakfast: An Essay on the Winter of Love. 1979. Whitmore Lake, MI: Bamberger Books, 1997.

I have the original 1979 Bantam edition of this book, but decided to buy the newer (though still over twenty years old! I can’t believe 1997 was that long ago already.) edition because I’ll be writing an essay on it later this summer and using the newer edition (which is still available new on amazon even though I think the publisher is out of business) will be more accessible for readers.

Luiselli, Valeria. Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2017.

Pérez, Hiram. A Taste for Brown Bodies: Gay Modernity and Cosmopolitan Desire. New York: New York University Press, 2015.

I would like to do more work on queer Latinx literature and bought this book because it relates to that intersection.

Rivera, Gabby. America: The Life and Times of America Chavez. Vol. 1. New York: Marvel, 2017.

I loved Rivera’s novel Juliet Takes a Breath and have been meaning to read this comic by her for a while. The book contains the first six issues of the eponymous comic. I must say that this volume is of lesser production quality than other Marvel omnibuses I have bought. The cover is quite flimsy.

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Books Acquired Recently: Desk Copy Edition

Publishers have sent me desk copies for my fall classes over the past few months. The Knisley and Tea are for my first-year composition course, the Ballard and McGuire are for my Introduction to Literature course, and the Everett and Vidal are for my American Literature Since 1945 course.

Ballard, J.G. Crash. 1973. New York: Picador, 2017.

Everett, Percival. Erasure. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2001.

Knisley, Lucy. Relish: My Life in the Kitchen. New York: First Second, 2013.

McGuire, Seanan. Every Heart a Doorway. New York: Tor, 2016.

Tea, Michelle. How to Grow Up: A Memoir. New York: Plume, 2015.

Vidal, Gore. The City and the Pillar. 1948. New York: Vintage, 2003.

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Books Acquired Recently

Ferris, Emil. My Favorite Thing is Monsters. Seattle: Fantagraphics Books, 2016.

I heard about this book, Kang’s book, and Waite’s book when I was at Northeast MLA last month. They all sounded intriguing, so I decided to order them. Ferris’s book is a graphic novel that takes place in late-1960s Chicago and also includes queer characters, so I cannot wait to read it.

Hernandez, Keith. I’m Keith Hernandez: A Memoir. New York: Little, Brown, 2018.

As I’ve written here before, I am obsessed with the 1986 Mets, and will buy any book about them that I can find. I am quite excited to read this memoir by one of their key players. Of course the title comes from Hernandez’s line from the famous Seinfeld episode when Hernandez and Elaine go on a date. When he kisses her and she thinks “Who does this guy think he is?,” he thinks “I’m Keith Hernandez.” There’s also an excellent 20-minute documentary about Hernandez by the same name which is available to view for free here.

Kang, Han. The Vegetarian. 2007. Trans. Deborah Smith. London: Hogarth, 2015.

I don’t know much about this book, but apparently its translation is controversial because some people claim that the English translation is not an accurate one. It nevertheless won the Man Booker Prize, which is nothing to sneeze at.

Leitch, Vincent B. The Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism. 3rd ed. New York: W.W. Norton, 2018.

I received a free, unasked-for exam copy of this mammoth hardcover tome in the mail today. It was a nice surprise and I look forward to perusing it. I must say, however, that it contains woefully few pieces of queer theory.

Waite, Stacey. Teaching Queer: Radical Possibilities for Writing and Knowing. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2017.

I’ve read lots of queer theory, but never any that examines how to teach queerly, thus I was thrilled to find this book and will make sure to read it before I construct my syllabi for the fall.

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Books Acquired Recently: Friends Edition

Plett, Casey. Little Fish. Vancouver: Arsenal Pulp Press, 2018.

I received a review copy of this novel by fellow queer Mennonite Casey Plett from the Pacific Journal, which has asked me to write a review for its Fall 2018 issue. Plett and I are friends and I had the privilege of reading several drafts of the book in manuscript. It is so cool to see it in print! Plett’s first book, A Safe Girl to Love, won a Lambda Literary Award, and Little Fish is good enough that it has an excellent chance of doing the same.

Threadgill, Elizabeth. Tangled in the Light. Georgetown, KY: Finishing Line Press, 2018.

My friend and Utica College colleague Elizabeth Threadgill just had her first chapbook of poetry published. I read it last night and enjoyed it because of its minimalist, almost haiku-esque style.

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