Tag Archives: Mennonites

Books Acquired Recently

Amin, Kadji. Disturbing Attachments: Genet, Modern Pederasty, and Queer History. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2017.

I got a promotional email about this newly-released book from the publisher and ordered a copy right away. It’s an investigation of queer theory through examining the reception of Jean Genet’s work. I have keen interests in both of these subjects. There is a drawing of a naked man in bondage on the cover, so I know the book will be right down my alley.

Rak, Julie. Boom! Manufacturing Memoir for the Popular Market. Waterloo, ON: Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2013.

Rak, a life writing scholar, is going to be one of the keynote speakers at the Mennonite/s Writing VIII conference in Winnipeg next week. I bought Boom! in order to get an introduction to her work. I finished it last night and enjoyed it.

I ordered this book directly from amazon.com, and it took them a week and a half to ship it.

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Books Acquired Recently

Kraus, Chris. After Kathy Acker: A Literary Biography. South Pasadena, CA: Semiotext(e), 2017.

Acker is one of my favorite postmodern novelists and I was thus very excited to hear about this new authorized biography of her. It immediately jumped up to the top of my to-read list. I bought it and Watson’s novel from amazon.com’s network of independent booksellers.

Mount, Nick. Arrival: The Story of CanLit. Toronto: House of Anansi Press, 2017.

As a result of my interest in Mennonite literature, which includes numerous Canadian authors, I have been slowly building an interest in Canadian literature in general over the past decade or so. I found out about Mount’s new book on the rise of Canadian literature as a cultural force beginning in the 1960s when I went on House of Anansi Press’s website to check where they are located since they have recently stopped listing their location in their books. I bought it directly from the website and began reading it as soon as it arrived. It’s quite enjoyable thus far.

Watson, Sheila. The Double Hook. 1959. Toronto: McClelland & Stewart, 2008.

As part of my reading in my above-mentioned explorations of Canadian literature, I read an article about Watson’s archive, which includes some correspondence about the writing of this novel. The article made the novel sound interesting, so I decided to read it for myself.

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Books Acquired Recently

Beachy, Stephen. Glory Hole. Tuscaloosa, AL: FC2, 2017.

Beachy’s novel boneyard [sic] is one of the best novels I’ve ever read because of its description of queer Anabaptist bondage. After I read it I devoured Beachy’s other books, and have become a huge fan of his writing. Glory Hole is mentioned in boneyard, in which Beachy himself is a character, and when I first read it I thought to myself “I wish that novel existed.” I was thrilled to find out that Beachy was actually writing it in real life and pre-ordered it on amazon.com as soon as it was possible to do so. It came in the mail this week.

Freeman, Elizabeth. Time Binds: Queer Temporalities, Queer Histories. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010.

I keep seeing this book cited in the queer theory I’ve been reading lately, and decided to investigate it for myself.

I purchased this and Marcus’s book from amazon.com’s network of independent booksellers.

Loewen, Harry, ed. Mennonite Images: Historical, Cultural, and Literary Essays Dealing with Mennonite Issues. Winnipeg: Hyperion Press, 1980.

This was one of the first books to include scholarly discussions of Mennonite literature. I read it as soon as it arrived and even though the scholarship is rather dated it is interesting historically.

I bought this book from abebooks.com’s network of booksellers. The copy I acquired, the only one available, was listed on both abebooks and amazon, but the shipping on abebooks was about $2.00 cheaper.

Marcus, Sara. Girls to the Front: The True Story of the Riot Grrrl Revolution. New York: HarperPerennial, 2010.

Akin to the story of Freeman’s book, this book keeps getting cited in the scholarship I’ve been reading about queer archiving over the past year, so I decided to buy it and read it for myself.

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Books Acquired Recently

Andreas, Peter. Rebel Mother: My Childhood Chasing the Revolution. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2017.

I will be writing a review of this book for Mennonite Life, and received it from them. It is about a man raised by a Mennonite mother who was a political radical in the 1970s, an era that I am quite interested in, so I look forward to reading it.

Eichhorn, Kate. The Archival Turn in Feminism: Outrage in Order. 2013. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2014.

I came across a citation of this book in my recent reading on queer archiving and decided to buy it as a continuation of this reading.

Hurst, Michel, and Robert Swope. Casa Susanna. New York: powerHouse Books, 2005.

This is a book of found photographs from a 1960s resort where crossdressers would congregate. I am excited to view it as I continue to investigate queer history.

Martinac, Paula. Out of Time. 1990. Seattle: Seal Press, 1999.

After I ordered Casa Susanna, I was reading an article about lesbian fiction that recreates the queer past, and it mentioned Martinac’s novel, which is about a woman who finds an old photograph album that apparently once belonged to some lesbians. In other words, it is an earlier fictionalized narrative of how Casa Susanna came to be! I decided in light of this coincidence that I should buy it immediately.

Wiebe, Rudy. The Scorched-Wood People. Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1977.

This is one of the few Wiebe books that I do not already own. I read a critical essay recently which mentioned it. I did not realize that it was about the Louis Riel rebellion, a historical event that I know little about, but have been wanting to investigate further. So I decided to buy the novel as the beginning of my investigation.

 

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Books Acquired Recently

Del Rio, Vanessa, and Dian Hanson. Vanessa Del Rio: Fifty Years of Slightly Slutty Behavior. Cologne, Germany: Taschen, 2016.

I have come across a number of references to Vanessa Del Rio’s acting over the years. If I recall correctly, I first saw some of her work in an exhibit at the Museum of Sex in New York City. One of my favorite queer authors, Samuel R. Delany, writes fondly of her in Times Square Red, Times Square Blue.  Recently, I was reading Juana María Rodríguez’s Sexual Futures, Queer Gestures, and Other Latina Longings, and she cites Vanessa Del Rio, which is Del Rio’s autobiography, quite favorably, so I decided to buy it. I love Taschen’s high-quality books of photography, and have enjoyed several of Hanson’s books that they have published about sexuality, so I anticipate that Vanessa Del Rio will be an enjoyable, educational read.

Peterson, Zoey Leigh. Next Year for Sure. New York: Scribner, 2017.

I read a review of this novel about polyamory on Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian and it sounded quite fascinating, so I decided to buy it. I’m not sure that I’ve ever read a novel that investigates being poly as a central theme before, so it is exciting to come across this book!

Wiebe, Rudy. A Voice in the Land: Essays By and About Rudy Wiebe. Ed. W.J. Keith. Edmonton: NeWest Press, 1981.

Rudy Wiebe is the most prominent North American Mennonite writer. His influence on the field of Mennonite literature cannot be understated. In my research about his work I’ve often seen A Voice in the Land cited, but have never actually read it. I finally decided to do so.

All three books were purchased from amazon.com’s network of independent booksellers.

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Books Acquired Recently

I am trying to read as much queer literature and theory as I can this summer. The three following books fall under this rubric.

Butler, Alec. Rough Paradise. Toronto: Quattro Books, 2014.

Child, Abigail. Mouth to Mouth. Brooklyn: Eoagh Books, 2016.

Rodríguez, Juana María. Sexual Futures, Queer Gestures, and Other Latina Longings. New York: New York University Press, 2014.

This past weekend I attended the Crossing the Line: Women of Anabaptist Traditions Encounter Borders and Boundaries conference at Eastern Mennonite University. There was a small bookfair and I bought two books which I had signed by the authors (I already own many of the books that were on sale).

Loewen, Mary Ann. Sons and Mothers: Stories from Mennonite Men. Regina, SK: University of Regina Press, 2015.

Yoder, Anita Hooley. Circles of Sisterhood: A History of Mission, Service, and Fellowship in Mennonite Women’s Organizations. Harrisonburg, VA: Herald Press, 2017.

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Books Acquired Recently: Radical Women Edition

The most important intellectual experience of my life was when I first encountered feminist theory in a Feminist Theology course my second year of college. Feminism gave me a completely new way of viewing the world that has led me to become a much better person than I would have been otherwise. It has also led to my scholarly interests in minority literatures, most notably queer literature. The three books that I’ve acquired over the past few weeks in the U.S. (see the post I wrote yesterday to read more about the books I acquired on my recent trip to England) are evidence of my continued desire to encounter new feminist perspectives.

Breedlove, Lynn. Godspeed. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2002.

I had not heard of Breedlove, a member of the band Tribe 8, until recently when I came across several mentions of her in some queer theory I was reading (one mention was by Ann Cvetkovich and I think the other was by Jack Halberstam). Then I heard about this novel via Stryker’s book (see below) and it became a “Rule of Threes” thing: the universe was telling me to encounter some Breedlove. So I bought a copy of her book.

This and Stryker’s book were purchased from amazon.com’s network of independent booksellers.

Morris, Catherine, and Rujeko Hockley, ed. We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women 1965-85: A Sourcebook. Brooklyn: Brooklyn Museum, 2017.

I ordered an exam copy of this book from its distributor, Duke University Press, because I love radical literature from all traditions. While some of the documents it collects are well-known, most are not, so I anticipate that reading it will be an enjoyable journey of discovery. It looks like it would be an excellent resource for both African American Studies courses and Gender Studies courses.

Stryker, Susan. Transgender History. Berkeley, CA: Seal Press, 2008.

I love Stryker’s book on queer pulp fiction and have enjoyed other essays of hers as well, thus when I encountered a citation of this book while doing some writing on trans Mennonite literature I decided to buy it immediately. I have already read it and it is a strong, accessible introduction to the subject.

 

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