Monthly Archives: September 2019

Books Acquired Recently: Mostly 2019 Edition

Hemmings, Clare. Bisexual Spaces: A Geography of Sexuality and Gender. New York: Routledge, 2002.

I recently came across a citation of this book and decided to buy it despite its age because I am bisexual and because my research is concerned with space.

With the exception of Moore’s book, which I bought directly from the publisher, I bought all of these books from amazon.com. I bought Hemmings’s book new for $53.95 because there were not any used copies available for a reasonable price. It must be said that it is ridiculous that Routledge has not lowered the price for the book considering that it is seventeen years old (an eternity in academic publishing) and it is also now print-on-demand (I received the book yesterday and it was printed on 14 September), and thus of lower quality than the original paperback printing and also devoid of warehousing costs. I bought it because it feels necessary for me to read (texts on bisexuality are still woefully rare), and I am sympathetic to the struggles that academic publishers face in an increasingly-contracting market, but I haven’t been this annoyed about the price of a book since buying some overpriced textbooks my first semester of college.

Moore, Carley. The Not Wives. New York: Feminist Press, 2019.

I received an email advertisement for this novel and decided to buy it because it is about queer relationship models, something that is treated infrequently in literature.

Shatzkin, Mike, and Robert Paris Riger. The Book Business: What Everyone Needs to Know. New York: Oxford University Press, 2019.

As a bibliophile I of course bought this book as soon as I heard about it. I read it the other night and learned from it, though less than I was hoping. It is worth reading for anyone interested in trying to get a book published.

The Book Business provides an illustrative contrast to Hemmings’s book. It is also print-on-demand and is a recently released academic text, and yet it only cost $20.00.

Skeets, Jake. Eyes Bottle Dark with a Mouthful of Flowers. Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2019.

I read about this poetry collection in a recent issue of Poets & Writers and decided to buy it because I am always looking for new queer writers of color.

Zimmerman, Diana R. Certain as Afternoon/ Certa Come il Pomeriggio. Costa Rica: Self-published, 2019.

I enjoy Zimmerman’s memoir Marry a Mennonite Boy and Make Pie, so I decided to buy her new poetry collection about the death of her Italian husband. The poems are printed in both English and Italian.

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Books Acquired Recently: Albany Book Festival Edition

Yesterday I attended the second annual Albany Book Festival at SUNY Albany. It was an excellent time, with readings by big-name authors, writing workshops, and a large book fair of local authors and their work. I showed great restraint and only bought four books, all of which I was able to get inscribed.

Bartow, Stuart. quaking marsh. Winchester, VA: Pond Frog Editions, 2018.

Bartow and Ungar ran a haiku workshop that I attended and enjoyed. They had a table together at the book fair and I bought a book from each of them. They had a deal where each book was $15.00 or two for $25.00.

Jimenez, Stephanie. They Could Have Named Her Anything. New York: Little A, 2019.

Jimenez and Moraga spoke on a Latina writers panel. I had not heard of Jimenez before but her novel takes place in New York City, so I look forward to reading it.

Little A is amazon.com’s relatively new publishing arm. I appreciate that despite their evilness they are willing to publish new authors of color.

Moraga, Cherríe. Native Country of the Heart: A Memoir. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2019.

Moraga is a foundational queer Latinx writer and I was excited to buy her memoir and get to meet her briefly.

Incidentally, it drives me nuts that FSG does not use the Oxford Comma in their name.

Ungar, Barbara Louise. Charlotte Brontë, You Ruined My Life. Washington, D.C.: The Word Works, 2011.

I bought this particular book of Ungar’s because of the title. It is about divorce, a topic I am unfortunately familiar with. I am already more than a third of the way through the collection and enjoying it thus far.

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Books Acquired Recently

Collins, Patricia Hill. Intersectionality as Critical Social Theory. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2019.

As per usual with books from Duke University Press, I got a promotional email about this book and decided to order it immediately from them (they always give a 30% discount with the code SAVE30) because it is relevant for my research. They should really just have a subscription service for people like me!

Friend, Malcolm. Our Bruises Kept Singing Purple. Riverside, CA: Inlandia Books, 2018.

I read a friend’s review of this book recently, and as soon as I saw that it was by a fellow boricua I decided to buy it. I purchased it from amazon.com.

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