Tag Archives: queer

Books Acquired Recently

Friesen, Patrick. Outlasting the Weather: Selected and New Poems 1994-2020. Vancouver: Anvil Press, 2020.

As I just wrote here, Patrick Friesen is one of the most important Mennonite writers ever. It is therefore very exciting that his second volume of Selected Poems is now out.

Lisicky, Paul. Later: My Life at the Edge of the World. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2020.

Lisicky came and read at Utica College a few years ago. He’s a nice guy, so I’ve read some of his work since then, and appreciate its unabashed queerness. Memoir Twitter is all abuzz about his new memoir, and it sounds fascinating, so I decided to buy it.

Miller, E. Ethelbert. If God Invented Baseball: Poems. Westport, CT: City Point Press, 2018.

Miller has an article in the latest issue of The Writer’s Chronicle. After reading it, I decided to look up his work. I was excited to discover that he has a poetry collection about baseball, and decided that it sounded like a good book to acquire as an introduction to his work.

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Books Acquired Recently

Garcia, Benjamin. Thrown in the Throat. Minneapolis: Milkweed Editions, 2020.

I am acquainted with Garcia, and pre-ordered a copy of this, his first poetry collection, a few months ago. It came in the mail this week. I started reading it immediately and it is excellent so far. It is unabashedly queer and Latinx, with a variety of styles that keeps readers on our toes.

Stansberry, Matt, and David Wilson. Rust Belt Arcana: Tarot and Natural History in the Exurban Wilds. Cleveland: Belt Publishing, 2018.

A friend who knows that I lived in the Midwest for a while and that I have been exploring tarot lately heard about this book and recommended it to me. It seems to be a book of personal essays connecting tarot to the Midwestern landscape. Place is also one of my scholarly interests, so I’m very excited to read the book.

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Sabbatical Productivity: June

I am on sabbatical until August and have been keeping a list in my journal of the academic activities I engage in. This practice is partly for myself, so that I make sure I am using the time productively, and partly for my institution, which requires me to write a report about the sabbatical once it finishes. Here is a list of what I accomplished in June, generally in chronological order. I did less than in some previous months (you can read about what I accomplished in May here) because I focused mostly on reading for a new writing project that I am beginning this week.

1. Updated the Mennonite/s Writing Bibliographies and blog throughout the month.

2. Peer reviewed a book in one of my fields for a university press.

3. Updated my website.

4. Was elected to the Sexual Minorities Archives‘s Board of Directors and worked on various tasks for it throughout the month.

5. Revised and submitted an essay about Mennonite speculative fiction for a special journal issue on Mennonite political theology.

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Books Acquired Recently

Bombardier, Cooper Lee. Pass with Care: Memoirs. New York: Dottir Press, 2020.

I first encountered Bombardier’s work in the anthology Meanwhile, Elsewhere: Science Fiction and Fantasy from Transgender Writers. His story there is fantastic, and I was excited to discover months ago on social media that he was coming out with a memoir. I pre-ordered it then and it arrived a few days ago.

Dunham, B. Mabel. Toward Sodom. Toronto: Macmillan, 1927.

I recently learned about Dunham and her path-breaking writing in the field of Mennonite literature. Her novel The Trail of the Conestoga might be the first Mennonite novel in English, and its sequel, Toward Sodom, might be the second. I was able to find a used copy of the latter online. It arrived in the mail today.

Zapruder, Matthew. Why Poetry. New York: Ecco, 2017.

As I mentioned in a recent post, “I’ve been thinking a lot lately about the role of literature in apocalyptic times such as these. Reading poetry on a daily basis is helping me to survive emotionally. Therefore, I’ve been looking for texts related to this subject.” Acquiring Zapruder’s book is part of these explorations.

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Books Acquired Recently: Duke Sale Edition

I recently ordered a few more books from Duke University Press because they had a 50% off sale for most of May. Two of them came in the mail yesterday.

Crawley, Ashton C. The Lonely Letters. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2020.

This book got on my radar via a promotional email, and I decided to buy it because it is at the intersection of “black queer studies / religion / creative nonfiction,” to cite the marketing labels on its back cover. I am interested in all of these fields as a reader and as a writer, so I am excited to read the book.

Fisher, Gary. Gary in Your Pocket: Stories and Notebooks of Gary Fisher. Ed. Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1996.

I’ve been catching up on my Sedgwick reading during the pandemic, and am now at the point where I am reading secondary texts/texts peripheral to her oeuvre. This book falls into that category. Apparently some of Fisher’s work is kinky erotica, so I am especially looking forward to reading it. I must say, though, that when I opened the package of books I was disappointed to see that Gary in Your Pocket is not pocket-sized despite its title. A missed opportunity!

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Books Acquired Recently: Queer Archiving Edition

Kumbier, Alana. Ephemeral Material: Queering the Archive. Sacramento, CA: Litwin Books, 2014.

This book has been on my to-read shelf for a while, and I finally decided to buy it.

Sheffield, Rebecka Taves. Documenting Rebellions: A Study of Four Lesbian and Gay Archives in Queer Times. Sacramento, CA: Litwin Books, 2020.

While I was on the Litwin Books website looking for Kumbier’s book, I came across this new book by Sheffield and decided to buy it because I cite one of her articles, which I love, in my book, and have also taught the article in one of my writing classes, so I am excited to read more of her work. She is Canadian, so I wonder whether “Taves” is an Anglicization of “Toews,” and thus whether she has Mennonite heritage.

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Books Acquired Recently: Sedgwick Edition

I mentioned in my last post that I am reading more of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s work. These two books are a part of that effort. I’m especially excited to read Fat Art, Thin Art because I haven’t read any of Sedgwick’s poetry before.

Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Fat Art, Thin Art. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1994.

—. The Weather in Proust. Ed. Jonathan Goldberg. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011.

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Books Acquired Recently

Abraham, George. Birthright: Poems. Minneapolis: Button Poetry, 2020.

I heard Abraham read in a virtual reading last week. I had never encountered his work before, but was completely blown away by it and decided to order his book right away. The reading was through an independent bookstore in Pittsburgh, and they had a link to order the poets’ books through bookshop.org, which is a new website run by independent bookstores to give them an online presence as an alternative to amazon.com. They are taking extra precautions to keep their warehouse workers safe during the pandemic, and their service was fast anyway. I highly recommend them!

Galasso, William Scott. Rough Cut: Thirty Years of Senryu. Laguna Woods, CA: Galwin Press, 2019.

I recently read a review of this book in Frogpond and decided to buy it as a result. I’ve been writing senryu myself lately, but it is hard to find collections or anthologies of them, so I was excited to hear about Galasso’s book.

López, Casandra. Brother Bullet: Poems. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2019.

López read with Abraham, and was also wonderful, so I ordered her book too. She read from a memoir in progress as well, and that was even better than her poetry–I’m excited to read it once it is finished.

Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Tendencies. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1993.

I’ve been reading a lot about Sedgwick’s work lately and decided that I should read more of it myself. This is an essay collection that gets cited all the time in queer theory. I will say that these ridiculous one- or two-word titles that some academics use for their books drive me nuts because they tell potential readers nothing about what the book is about. A brief subtitle (e.g., Tendencies: Essays on X, or Tendencies: X, Y, and Z) would work wonders.

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Books Acquired Recently

Duke University Press is having a 50% off sale through the end of this month, so I ordered two of their recent releases.

Brim, Matt. Poor Queer Studies: Confronting Elitism in the University. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2020.

Brim and I were on the same panel at MLA this past January, and he seems like a nice guy, so I was pleased when I saw that he has a new book out. We both teach at schools with large first-generation college student populations, thus I expect his book to be helpful for my own teaching.

Kumar, Amitava. Every Day I Write the Book: Notes on Style. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2020.

I love books about academia and find it helpful as a refresher for my writing to read a style manual every once in a while, and thus was intrigued when I got an email advertising this new book. At 50% off I couldn’t resist.

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Books Acquired Recently

Coleman, Wanda. Wicked Enchantment: Selected Poems. Edited by Terrance Hayes. Boston: Black Sparrow Press, 2020.

I love Coleman’s work and am sad that she is not more well-known or more frequently read. I am very excited that this posthumous Selected Poems has come out so that new readers can discover her.

Doty, Mark. What is the Grass: Walt Whitman in My Life. New York: W.W. Norton, 2020.

I love Whitman, queer memoir, and poetry, and thus when I heard about this book several months ago I pre-ordered it immediately. My copy came yesterday.

Reimer, Nikki. My Heart is a Rose Manhattan. Vancouver: Talonbooks, 2019.

I am reviewing this poetry collection for the Journal of Mennonite Studies, and my review copy came today.

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