Tag Archives: Samantha Irby

Books Acquired Recently

As I mentioned in a recent post, I panic-ordered a bunch of books when the pandemic hit to make sure that I don’t run out of reading material. The rest of them have come in.

Chavez, Felicia Rose, José Olivarez, and Willie Perdomo, eds. The BreakBeat Poets, Volume 4: LatiNext. Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2020.

I’m looking for a poetry anthology for my Latinx Literature course next semester, and this anthology is one of the candidates.

Freedman, Carl, ed. Conversations with Samuel R. Delany. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2009.

This book came out just as I was working on research for my dissertation, which had a chapter on Delany, and I missed it because it wasn’t listed in scholarly databases yet. I’m not sure how I failed to come across it in the ensuing decade, but I put it on my to-buy list as soon as I encountered a reference to it recently.

Irby, Samantha. Wow, No Thank You. Essays. New York: Vintage Books, 2020.

I love Irby’s previous book, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, and wanted to buy her new book right away. Due to the pandemic, a bookstore where she lives in Michigan ran a promotion in which you could order a copy and she would inscribe it for you however you wanted before the store mailed it. I had her inscribe mine “Happy pandemic! Queer of color solidarity!”

Jackson, Major, ed. The Best American Poetry 2019. New York: Scribner, 2019.

I don’t normally buy the volumes in The Best American Poetry series, but decided to buy this one as part of my poetry panic-buying. The Best American Poetry 1999 is the only other volume I have in the series (which has only been edited by a woman nine times in the series’s 32-year history, inexcusable) because I thought it would be fascinating to have a memento of what American poetry was like just before the new century, so maybe I’ll buy it every twenty years.

Xanathar’s Guide to Everything. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2017.

I recently became part of an online Dungeons & Dragons campaign that is using some of the resources in this book, so I decided to buy a copy for myself.

 

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Books Acquired Recently

Blanco, Richard. How to Love a Country: Poems. Boston: Beacon Press, 2019.

I was browsing the poetry section at my local Barnes & Noble today (perhaps surprisingly, they had a rather impressive selection of new stuff along with the “classics”) and came across Blanco’s new collection. I read a few poems and enjoyed them, so decided to buy it. I’ve never read any of his poetry before even though I teach his memoir in one of my writing classes.

Irby, Samantha. Meaty: Essays. New York: Vintage Books, 2018.

This is a revised edition of Irby’s first book, which I also found while browsing at B&N. I love Irby’s second book, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, so buying this one was an easy choice.

Negrón-Muntaner, Frances. Boricua Pop: Puerto Ricans and the Latinization of American Culture. New York: New York University Press, 2004.

This book is somewhat old, but sadly not that much has been written about Puerto Rican work in the arts since then, so I feel that it is necessary to read it because part of my current project includes a discussion of Puerto Rican literature.

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Books Acquired Recently: Desk Copy Edition

Over the past few months publishers have sent me a number of desk copies for my Fall 2019 courses.

For First-Year Composition:

Blanco, Richard. The Prince of Los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood. 2014. New York: Ecco, 2015.

Irby, Samantha. We Are Never Meeting in Real Life: Essays. New York: Vintage Books, 2017.

Knisley, Lucy. Relish: My Life in the Kitchen. New York: First Second, 2013.

Tea, Michelle. How to Grow Up: A Memoir. New York: Plume, 2015.

As is evident from Blanco’s, Irby’s, and Tea’s books, this is sneakily a queer memoir class as well.

For American Literature Before 1865:

Brown, Charles Brockden. Wieland and Memoirs of Carwin the Biloquist. New York: Penguin Books, 1991.

This, Irving’s, and Wilson’s books are Penguin Classics, which I love.

Hollander, John, ed. American Poetry: The Nineteenth Century, Volume One; Philip Freneau to Walt Whitman. New York: Library of America, 1993.

Over the past year I’ve begun the practice of assigning a poetry anthology in all of my literature classes, which has been an excellent decision. We read one or two poems at the beginning of each class and then spend the rest of the class talking about the longer reading for the day.

Irving, Washington. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Other Stories. New York: Penguin Books, 2014.

Wilson, Harriet E. Our Nig, Or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black. 1859. New York: Penguin Books, 2009.

For African American Literature:

Delany, Samuel R. Dark Reflections. 2007. Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, 2016.

This is an excellent novel that was out of print for quite a while (an issue that many of Delany’s best novels have, unfortunately). I have been wanting to teach it since I first read it, and am glad that Dover has now made this possible.

Harper, Michael S., and Anthony Walton, eds. The Vintage Book of African American Poetry: 200 Years of Vision, Struggle, Power, Beauty, and Triumph from 50 Outstanding Poets. New York: Vintage Books, 2000.

Lorde, Audre. Zami: A New Spelling of My Name. Berkeley, CA: Crossing Press, 1982.

This is one of my favorite memoirs ever.

Morrison, Toni. Sula. 1973. New York: Vintage International, 2004.

Walker, Alice. Meridian. 1976. Orlando: Harvest, 2003.

I wrote a dissertation chapter on this novel many years ago, haha.

 

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Books Acquired Recently: More Queer Books Edition

Irby, Samantha. We Are Never Meeting in Real Life: Essays. New York: Vintage Books, 2017.

I read about this essay collection on Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian and decided to buy it immediately because I have been looking for new queer life writing that might be suitable to use for teaching. I bought this and McGuire’s book from amazon.com’s network of independent booksellers.

McGuire, Seanan. Every Heart a Doorway. New York: Tor, 2016.

I am teaching a queer literature course this semester and mentioned that I did not know of any books about asexual characters to include in the course, though I am sure that they exist. A student did some research online and found out about this book, which supposedly does include a major asexual character, so I bought it immediately. I had not heard of McGuire before, but apparently they are a highly lauded science fiction writer. Once again, speculative fiction and queer fiction go hand in hand!

Richardson, Suzanne. Oh Niagara! Utica, NY: Suzanne Richardson, 2018.

I bought this zine by a colleague of mine at the Tramontane Cafe in Utica. It was produced to commemorate the Tram’s tenth anniversary earlier this month.

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