Books Acquired Recently

As I mentioned in a recent post, I panic-ordered a bunch of books when the pandemic hit to make sure that I don’t run out of reading material. The rest of them have come in.

Chavez, Felicia Rose, José Olivarez, and Willie Perdomo, eds. The BreakBeat Poets, Volume 4: LatiNext. Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2020.

I’m looking for a poetry anthology for my Latinx Literature course next semester, and this anthology is one of the candidates.

Freedman, Carl, ed. Conversations with Samuel R. Delany. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2009.

This book came out just as I was working on research for my dissertation, which had a chapter on Delany, and I missed it because it wasn’t listed in scholarly databases yet. I’m not sure how I failed to come across it in the ensuing decade, but I put it on my to-buy list as soon as I encountered a reference to it recently.

Irby, Samantha. Wow, No Thank You. Essays. New York: Vintage Books, 2020.

I love Irby’s previous book, We Are Never Meeting in Real Life, and wanted to buy her new book right away. Due to the pandemic, a bookstore where she lives in Michigan ran a promotion in which you could order a copy and she would inscribe it for you however you wanted before the store mailed it. I had her inscribe mine “Happy pandemic! Queer of color solidarity!”

Jackson, Major, ed. The Best American Poetry 2019. New York: Scribner, 2019.

I don’t normally buy the volumes in The Best American Poetry series, but decided to buy this one as part of my poetry panic-buying. The Best American Poetry 1999 is the only other volume I have in the series (which has only been edited by a woman nine times in the series’s 32-year history, inexcusable) because I thought it would be fascinating to have a memento of what American poetry was like just before the new century, so maybe I’ll buy it every twenty years.

Xanathar’s Guide to Everything. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2017.

I recently became part of an online Dungeons & Dragons campaign that is using some of the resources in this book, so I decided to buy a copy for myself.

 

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