Tag Archives: Gloria Anzaldúa

Books Acquired Recently: Quarantine Edition

I ordered a bunch of books recently because I am not sure how long the pandemic self-isolation situation will last or how long it will still be possible to acquire new books–my local Barnes & Noble closed even before New York’s shelter in place edict went into effect, and many independent bookstores are no longer shipping orders. Some of these books have arrived in the past few days.

Cruz, Cynthia. Other Musics: New Latina Poetry. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2019.

I am teaching a Latinx Literature course in the fall and am still working on the syllabus. I bought Cruz’s anthology, along with Guzmán and Morales’s, to check out for possible use as one of my texts. I bought Gurba’s memoir and Rechy’s novel for the same reason.

Gurba, Myriam. Mean. Minneapolis: Coffee House Press, 2017.

Guzmán, Roy G., and Miguel M. Morales, eds. Pulse/Pulso: In Remembrance of Orlando. Richmond, VA: Damaged Goods Press, 2018.

Rechy, John. The Miraculous Day of Amalia Gómez. 1991. New York: Grove Press, 2001.

silva, ire’ne lara, and Dan Vera, eds. Imaniman: Poets Writing in the Anzaldúan Borderlands. San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books, 2016.

Poetry has been an essential tool of survival for me during the pandemic, and I have been trying to stockpile as much of it as possible, which is part of why four of these six books belong to the genre. I have been reading lots of Gloria Anzaldúa’s work over the past half-year, so now I am beginning to read other writers’ work about her and her ideas.

Smart, Christopher. A Selection of Poetry. Ed. David Wheeler. N.p.: CreateSpace, 2012.

I’ve always enjoyed the most famous part of Smart’s poem “Jubilate Agno” about his cat, Jeoffry, and decided that it would be nice to read the entire poem. This is apparently the only edition of his work currently in print.

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Books Acquired Recently

Ahmed, Sara. Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2006.

Anzaldúa, Gloria E. Light in the Dark/Luz En Lo Oscuro: Rewriting Identity, Spirituality, Reality. Ed. AnaLouise Keating. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2015.

One of the goals of my sabbatical is to continue to fill in the gaps in my queer reading. I bought Ahmed’s and Anzaldúa’s books to help me with this goal.

Bonilla, Yarimar, and Marisol LeBrón, eds. Aftershocks of Disaster: Puerto Rico Before and After the Storm. Chicago: Haymarket Books, 2019.

Another sabbatical goal is to read more about Latinx literature in general and within Puerto Rican studies specifically. This anthology along with González’s and Morales’s books are part of this reading.

Cheung, Theresa. The Dream Dictionary from A to Z: The Ultimate A-Z to Interpret the Secrets of Your Dreams. London: HarperCollins, 2019.

As I’ve been getting more into the tarot I’ve been thinking more about my dreams because some cards relate to them. I was not looking for a dream dictionary but the other day I walked into my local Barnes & Noble and this book was sitting in the entryway (which I normally never glance at when I walk into the store) and caught my eye, like it was calling me. I bought it immediately.

Chin-Tanner, Wendy. Anyone Will Tell You. Little Rock, AR: Sibling Rivalry Press, 2019.

Chin-Tanner gave a strong poetry reading at Utica College last week. I was happy to buy one of her books.

González, Christopher. Permissable Narratives: The Promise of Latino/a Literature. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 2017.

Morales, Ed. Fantasy Island: Colonialism, Exploitation, and the Betrayal of Puerto Rico. New York: Bold Type Books, 2019.

Schaefer, Donovan O. Religious Affects: Animality, Evolution, and Power. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2015.

I am interested in affect theory and my work has been dialoguing with religious ideas more and more over the past year, so this book may be helpful for my thinking.

Swarstad Johnson, Julie. Pennsylvania Furnace. Greensboro, NC: Unicorn Press, 2019.

I met Swarstad Johnson this past weekend at the Cincinnati Mennonite Arts Festival, where she was one of the presenters. We had some good conversations and I enjoyed hearing her work. I was pleased to buy her book. It’s always exciting to discover new Mennonite writers!

 

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Books Acquired Recently: Queer Latinx Edition

Anzaldúa, Gloria. The Gloria Anzaldúa Reader. Ed. AnaLouise Keating. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2009.

I’ve been reading Anzaldúa’s Interviews/Entrevistas, which is amazing, so I want to explore more of her work. I am often skeptical of authors’ “Readers” because I would rather read work in its original context, but Anzaldúa’s Reader includes a lot of work that was not published during her lifetime.

Silvera, Adam. More Happy Than Not. New York: Soho Teen, 2015.

I recently ran across an essay about this book and decided to buy it because it is about a queer Puerto Rican from New York City, a narrative that fits my own.

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Books Acquired Recently

Anzaldúa, Gloria E. Interviews/Entrevistas. Ed. AnaLouise Keating. New York: Routledge, 2000.

More and more of what I am interested in reading these days cites Anzaldúa, so I have been starting to explore more of her work myself. I am especially eager to read this book because I have also been investigating the role of life writing (a category which I argue includes interviews) as theory.

moore, madison. Fabulous: The Rise of the Beautiful Eccentric. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2018.

I recently ran across a citation of this book and it sounded interesting, so I decided to buy it and read it for myself.

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Books Acquired Recently: Getting Paid Edition

I decided to spend some of the money I received for my recent New York Times article on a variety of books, some that I’ve been interested in for a while but have not gotten around to, a few that have recently been recommended to me, and a few that have recently been published by friends. Aside from Reed’s book, which I purchased from the publisher, I bought all of them from amazon.com.

Anzaldúa, Gloria. Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza. 4th ed. San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books, 2012.

Baker, Nicholson. Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization. 2008. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2009.

Broder, Melissa. The Pisces. London: Hogarth, 2018.

Dearinger, Amber, ed. The Heart of Aces. Manteca, CA: Good Mourning Publishing, 2012.

Esquibel, Catrióna Rueda. With Her Machete in Her Hand: Reading Chicana Lesbians. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2006.

Fernandes, Fabio, and Djibril al-Ayad, eds. We See a Different Frontier: A Postcolonial Speculative Fiction Anthology. N.p.: Futurefire.net Publishing, 2013.

Hamilton, Jane Eaton. Weekend. Vancouver: Arsenal Pulp Press, 2016.

Janzen, Rebecca. Liminal Sovereignty: Mennonites and Mormons in Mexican Culture. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2018.

Kaldera, Raven. Dark Moon Rising: Pagan BDSM and the Ordeal Path. Hubbardston, MA: Asphodel Press, 2006.

Lemus, Felicia Luna. Like Son. New York: Akashic Books, 2007.

Reed, Ken Yoder. Both My Sons. Morgantown, PA: Masthof Press, 2016.

Ruti, Mari. The Ethics of Opting Out: Queer Theory’s Defiant Subjects. New York: Columbia University Press, 2017.

Shipley, Ely. Some Animal. New York: Nightboat Books, 2018.

Zimmerman, Diana R. Marry a Mennonite Boy and Make Pie. Newton, KS: Workplay Publishing, 2018.

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