Tag Archives: Adrienne Rich

Books Acquired Recently

Cameron, Melanie. Holding the Dark. Winnipeg: The Muses’ Company, 1999.

I first encountered Cameron’s poetry in a 1999 issue of Rhubarb, the journal of the Mennonite Literary Society. The poem there is about two women who are lovers. Queer Mennonite literature is, of course, one of my academic specialties, so I decided to buy the collection from which the poem came.

I purchased this book from amazon.com’s network of independent booksellers.

Cofer, Judith Ortiz. The Latin Deli: Telling the Lives of Barrio Women. 1993. New York: W.W. Norton, 1995.

I received this mixed-genre book, Sharif’s collection of poems, and Sherman’s book as early birthday gifts yesterday. I’ve already finished Sharif’s, which was fantastic.

Rich, Adrienne. Adrienne Rich: Poetry and Prose. 2nd ed. Edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi, Albert Gelpi, and Brett Millier. New York: W.W. Norton, 2018.

I just received an exam copy of this revised edition from the publisher in the mail. The first edition from 1993 is excellent. This new edition includes a robust selection of Rich’s work from the last two decades of her life.

Sharif, Solmaz. Look. Minneapolis: Graywolf Press, 2016.

Sherman, Erik. Kings of Queens: Life Beyond Baseball with the ’86 Mets. New York: Berkley Books, 2016.

Tinsley, Omise’eke Natasha. Ezili’s Mirrors: Imagining Black Queer Genders. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018.

The queer/people of color intersection is another one of my research interests, as is religion and literature, so I bought this book that examines all three of these areas directly from the publisher as soon as I heard about it.

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Books Acquired Recently

A bunch of books arrived all at once this past week, so now I have plenty of reading material for the upcoming Winter Break!

Laing, Olivia. The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone. New York: Picador, 2016.

I read a review of this book when it came out and it sounded interesting both because I love cities and because I am an introvert and enjoy being alone. I finally got around to buying it.

I purchased Laing’s, Nicholson’s, and Oyeyemi’s books from amazon.com.

Nicholson, Hope. Love Beyond Body, Space & Time: An Indigenous LGBT Sci-Fi Anthology. Winnipeg: Bedside Press, 2016.

Oyeyemi, Helen. What is Not Yours is Not Yours: Stories. 2016. New York: Riverhead Books, 2017.

I recently read about these two books in an article by Casey from Casey the Canadian Lesbrarian and decided to buy them immediately because of my love of queer literature and my desire to encounter as many queer authors as possible. The fact that the title of Nicholson’s book does not use the Oxford Comma is driving me nuts.

Rice-González, Charles. Chulito. New York: Magnus Books, 2011.

I encountered this and Rivera’s novel (both which were bought from amazon.com’s network of independent booksellers) in a paper title while I was perusing the program for the 2018 MLA convention. I had never heard of either one, but am always happy to encounter queer Latinx narratives, so I bought them both right away.

Rich, Adrienne. Adrienne Rich’s Poetry and Prose. Edited by Barbara Charlesworth Gelpi and Albert Gelpi. New York: W.W. Norton, 1993.

I saw an ad for a new edition of this book in the September issue of PMLA. I requested an exam copy from the publisher, but they accidentally sent me the older edition. I did not have a copy of the 1993 edition, so I have been reading it and enjoying it thus far.

Rivera, Gabby. Juliet Takes a Breath. Riverdale, NY: Riverdale Avenue Books, 2016.

Schroeder, Karl. Lockstep. 2014. New York: Tor, 2015.

A friend of mine recently told me about Schroeder, who is a Canadian Mennonite speculative fiction writer. I decided to buy one of his books because I am interested in writing more scholarship about Mennonite speculative fiction, a field that has recently been growing explosively.

Taylor, Valerie. The Girls in 3B. 1959. New York: Feminist Press, 2012.

I received a desk copy of this pulp fiction classic from the publisher because I am planning to include it in my queer literature class next semester. I read it a few days ago and quite enjoyed it.

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