Tag Archives: Frank Brady

Books Acquired Recently: Mostly Birthday Edition

My birthday is this week and I have already received several books as gifts. There is no gift better!

Brady, Frank. Endgame: Bobby Fischer’s Remarkable Rise and Fall–from America’s Brightest Prodigy to the Edge of Madness. New York: Broadway Paperbacks, 2012.

I am a recovering chess addict who has always been fascinated by Bobby Fischer, the greatest American chess player ever. Brady’s first biography of Fischer, Profile of a Prodigy, is one of my favorite books ever, and I look forward to reading this sequel.

Castro, Jennifer, ed. All You Need is Love: Honoring the Diversity of Women’s Voices in Theology. Elkhart, IN: Mennonite Church USA, 2016.

I am friends with several of the contributors to this book, which collects essays from the 2014 Women Doing Theology conference. Mennonite theology needs all the help it can get from those on the margins, thus I am excited to see what ideas the book’s writers have to offer.

Palahniuk, Chuck. Haunted. 2005. New York: Anchor Books, 2006.

This is one of the few Palahniuk books that I have not read. His books are either brilliant or terrible.

Shigekuni, Julie. Unending Nora. Los Angeles: Red Hen Press, 2008.

Shigekuni gave a reading earlier this week at the local Barnes & Noble. She was very personable and chatted at length with the students present after the reading. I decided to buy this novel rather than a more recent one because a colleague told me that it involves autoerotic asphyxiation and I am always looking for new fictional representations of kink.

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Books Acquired Recently

Doyle, Arthur Conan. A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four. 1888 and 1890. Mineola: Dover, 2003.

Frederic, Harold. The Damnation of Theron Ware. 1896. Mineola: Dover, 2012.

I just recently heard of Harold Frederic (Utica College’s student literary society is named after him), who was from my new town of Utica, New York, and is buried less than a mile from my apartment. His major novel, The Damnation of Theron Ware, takes place in Utica, so I decided to buy it (and hopefully read it in the next week or two) as a part of my continuing investigations of the area. If I enjoy it there is a good chance I will include it in my American Literature After 1865 course next semester.

I have also been meaning to buy A Study in Scarlet for a while because it takes place in my just-now former state of Utah. I look forward to seeing how a British author depicts the bizarre realities of pre-statehood “Deseret.”

As an aside, note that for Doyle’s book the name of the volume itself is “A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four,” therefore according to MLA formatting only the “and” is italicized because the volume’s title should be italicized, but of course in italicized titles that include book titles (i.e., in this case, A Study in Scarlet and The Sign of Four) the normally italicized titles must receive another form of emphasis since the entire title of the volume is already theoretically italicized. I understand the logic of this, but it just looks weird. I would much prefer if the “and” were the only word not italicized. I am all for MLA style’s attention to detail, but certain elements of it drive me up a wall.

As a second aside, Dover books are fantastic. I often assign them in my classes when I can because they are so inexpensive. Most people are familiar with Dover as a result of their editions of classic literary works, but they publish a wide-ranging list, including several significant chess books such as Frank Brady’s Bobby Fischer: Profile of a Prodigy and Hans Kmoch’s Pawn Power in Chess. The protagonist in Nicholson Baker’s novel The Fermata is in the process of writing a history of Dover as his M.A. thesis, and I’ve always wished I could read it. Baker himself would be the perfect person to write such a history because of his love of print culture, and especially print culture ephemera.

I’ve been reading David Foster Wallace’s essays for the past week-and-a-half, which is why this post is so footnote-y.

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