Tag Archives: Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick

Books Acquired Recently: Duke Sale Edition

I recently ordered a few more books from Duke University Press because they had a 50% off sale for most of May. Two of them came in the mail yesterday.

Crawley, Ashton C. The Lonely Letters. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2020.

This book got on my radar via a promotional email, and I decided to buy it because it is at the intersection of “black queer studies / religion / creative nonfiction,” to cite the marketing labels on its back cover. I am interested in all of these fields as a reader and as a writer, so I am excited to read the book.

Fisher, Gary. Gary in Your Pocket: Stories and Notebooks of Gary Fisher. Ed. Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1996.

I’ve been catching up on my Sedgwick reading during the pandemic, and am now at the point where I am reading secondary texts/texts peripheral to her oeuvre. This book falls into that category. Apparently some of Fisher’s work is kinky erotica, so I am especially looking forward to reading it. I must say, though, that when I opened the package of books I was disappointed to see that Gary in Your Pocket is not pocket-sized despite its title. A missed opportunity!

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Books Acquired Recently: Sedgwick Edition

I mentioned in my last post that I am reading more of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s work. These two books are a part of that effort. I’m especially excited to read Fat Art, Thin Art because I haven’t read any of Sedgwick’s poetry before.

Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Fat Art, Thin Art. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1994.

—. The Weather in Proust. Ed. Jonathan Goldberg. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011.

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Books Acquired Recently

Abraham, George. Birthright: Poems. Minneapolis: Button Poetry, 2020.

I heard Abraham read in a virtual reading last week. I had never encountered his work before, but was completely blown away by it and decided to order his book right away. The reading was through an independent bookstore in Pittsburgh, and they had a link to order the poets’ books through bookshop.org, which is a new website run by independent bookstores to give them an online presence as an alternative to amazon.com. They are taking extra precautions to keep their warehouse workers safe during the pandemic, and their service was fast anyway. I highly recommend them!

Galasso, William Scott. Rough Cut: Thirty Years of Senryu. Laguna Woods, CA: Galwin Press, 2019.

I recently read a review of this book in Frogpond and decided to buy it as a result. I’ve been writing senryu myself lately, but it is hard to find collections or anthologies of them, so I was excited to hear about Galasso’s book.

López, Casandra. Brother Bullet: Poems. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2019.

López read with Abraham, and was also wonderful, so I ordered her book too. She read from a memoir in progress as well, and that was even better than her poetry–I’m excited to read it once it is finished.

Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Tendencies. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1993.

I’ve been reading a lot about Sedgwick’s work lately and decided that I should read more of it myself. This is an essay collection that gets cited all the time in queer theory. I will say that these ridiculous one- or two-word titles that some academics use for their books drive me nuts because they tell potential readers nothing about what the book is about. A brief subtitle (e.g., Tendencies: Essays on X, or Tendencies: X, Y, and Z) would work wonders.

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Books Acquired Recently

Ahmed, Sara. Living a Feminist Life. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2017.

Duke University Press, purveyors of a plethora of significant queer texts, were having a summer sale, so I got this and Sedgwick’s book for fifty percent off. I’ve been thinking about buying Ahmed’s book on and off since it came out a few months ago, and the sale made it the right time to do so.

Eggers, Dave. The Circle. 2013. New York: Vintage Books, 2014.

I was given this book as a gift by a friend after we saw the film version together last week. I enjoyed the film, and also enjoyed the book (the film is generally a good adaptation, but with a very different ending), which I finished a few days ago. However, I think I would have liked the book less if I had read it first, and I’m not sure how to feel about that. Normally the book is always better than the movie, but in this case it might be the other way around. Also, the dystopia that Eggers tries to portray in the book sounds like paradise in comparison to the U.S.’s current political reality.

Sedgwick, Eve Kosofsky. Touching Feeling: Affect, Pedagogy, Performativity. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2003.

Sedgwick is one of the most important figures in the development of both queer theory and affect theory. Touching Feeling keeps getting cited in my recent reading of queer theory as a part of my current writing project, so I thought I should go ahead and read it myself.

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