Tag Archives: Gayatri Gopinath

Books Acquired Recently

Ali, Agha Shahid. A Nostalgist’s Map of America. New York: W.W. Norton, 1991.

I ordered this book after encountering an excerpt of one of its poems in Gayatri Gopinath’s Unruly Visions. I am always interested in investigating the work of queer authors whom I haven’t read before.

Ewalt, David M. Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It. New York: Scribner, 2014.

A group of friends and I have begun playing D&D over the past six months or so and I am becoming more and more obsessed with it. I decided to order this history of the game to help me gain a better understanding of its roots.

Myles, Eileen, and Liz Kotz, eds. The New Fuck You: Adventures in Lesbian Reading. South Pasadena, CA: Semiotext(e), 1995.

I recently read about this anthology in Maggie Nelson’s book about women and the New York School of poets and decided to buy it because how could I not buy a queer book called The New Fuck You? I began reading it this weekend and the work–a mix of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction–is excellent thus far.

All three books were ordered from amazon.com.

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Books Acquired Recently

It’s a good thing that the holiday break is coming up because I continue to acquire books at a rapid pace! I am very excited to have lots of forthcoming reading time once finals week finishes this coming Friday.

Gopinath, Gayatri. Unruly Visions: The Aesthetic Practice of Queer Diaspora. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2018.

I’m on Duke University Press’s email list because they are the premier publishers of queer scholarship. I got a notice about this new book and ordered it from them immediately because it focuses on queer experience outside of North America, something that queer theory tends to ignore.

Green, Hank. An Absolutely Remarkable Thing. New York: Dutton, 2018.

I bought a signed copy of Green’s debut novel at Barnes & Noble last night because a student had recommended it to me due to its bisexual protagonist.

Orange, Tommy. There There. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2018.

I received this book as a holiday gift from a friend. I’ve seen it on display at bookstores and been intrigued by it, so I look forward to reading it.

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